Parent ‘super visas’ a viable option for Australia

Whilst the recent removal of a number of Australian visa categories may have dented the permanent residency ambitions of many migrants, there may be a silver lining according to former State President of the Migration Institute of Australia, Mark Glazbrook.  

Mr Glazbrook, a registered migration agent and Managing Director of Migration Solutions, says he anticipates the government will bring in a new range of long-stay temporary visas to compensate for the reduced number of permanent residency options, and would be based on models currently used in Canada.

The so-called ‘super-visas’ are valid for a period of up to 10 years and allow the holder to visit the country for up to two years at a time, making it a popular alternative to costly Parent visas.

“The removal of the non-contributory Parent visa option means that unless parents of migrants have access to funds approaching the $50,000 mark, there is no way for them to come and stay with their children in Australia,” he said.

“There is no reason to invent new migration or visa programs. Australia just needs to look around the world at other countries to see what works well and implement similar programs here.”

Mr Glazbrook says aside from the duration, the only major difference between a long-term temporary and permanent visa is access to Medicare and other entitlements, such as those available through Centrelink.

Long-stay temporary visas also include the added advantage of processing times being measured in months rather than the standard 15-20 year waiting period applied to certain Australian Parent visa categories.

Carer visa applicants could be another group of beneficiaries to a Canadian-inspired long-term visa option, with the ‘Live-in Caregiver Program,’ allowing young families to employ international nannies or Au pairs to assist with day-to-day child care activities.

“In Canada, live-in caregivers are considered to be individuals who are qualified to provide care for children, elderly persons or persons with disabilities in private homes,” said Mr Glazbrook.

“This could provide an ideal replacement for the recently scrapped 116 and 836 Carer visa, which has left many eligible migrants with health issues unable to have a family member stay in Australia and care for them for the duration of their illness.”

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