A recent article posted in online news website The Conversation has highlighted the importance of Australia’s post-war migrant intake as a major influence on the shaping of our contemporary society.

The article – an excerpt from Australian History in 7 Questions by John Hirst – discusses the success to which migrants integrated into Australian society following the end of World War II, permeating throughout all social classes and intermarrying with Australians and other migrant groups at a high rate.

The introduction of the migration program is described as “one of the most successful migration experiences in history”, enabling Australia to expand its economy and build our nation into a significant world power.

However also mentioned is the initial reservations with which migrants were greeted by Australians at the time; a stance similar to those that many migrants typically receive today.

“This article shows how migrants back in the 1940’s had to contend with very similar attitudes to what contemporary migrants face today,” said Managing Director of Migration Solutions, Mark Glazbrook.

“Australian’s views towards migrants are not souring. We are one of the most tolerant societies in the world, and as a result migrants have been able to make enormous contributions to Australia.”

“There will always be people who are against migration, which is disappointing, but what this article shows is that those people are very much in the minority here in Australia.”

Mr Glazbrook says the article proves that Australia is prepared to receive another significant intake of migrants despite a lack of massive public support.

“You are never going to see an enormous rally or protest demanding more migrants be let into Australia, that’s just unrealistic,” he said.

“However as this article illustrates, the success of Australia’s migration program is undeniable.”

“Until this ceases to be the case, it’s important that we continue to welcome migrants into our society and acknowledge the significant contributions they are capable of making.”

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